Writing News

Not your Grandmother’s Snow White Tale

 

Hello, sweet readers,

I have some fun news to share! Raven’s Heir and The Five Poisoned Apple collection are available for preorder on Amazon!

I can’t wait to introduce you to Damien and Kara. Snow White happens to be one of my favorite fairy-tale retellings. In Raven’s Heir, a young princess flees her evil stepmother and finds refuge with a band of rebels and spies, including one man she thought she would never see again. It’s a story of hope, even when traveling through the darkest of valleys.

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As much as I adore Disney and classic fairytales, Snow White is not an easy fairy-tale to work with. After all, who can forget the glorified Disney movie where the sweet girl lies in a glass coffin for everyone to see? Or Snow White’s frantic escape as hideous trees snag at her dress? Or Snow White singing while cleaning after seven dirty men? Yeah, that’s not going to happen at my house. Or how about the wicked middle-age queen plotting murder, simply because she cannot accept a wrinkle or two? In the historical and Disney versions, does Snow White ever really achieve agency and take charge despite the wild, dangerous world around her? Or is she saved simply by the kiss of a stranger?

The tale has plenty of darkness and the macabre as seen in the Grimm brothers’ 1812 version. A huntsman is charged with removing a young girl’s heart and an evil queen gets her comeuppance when she is forced (by the prince, no less) to dance in red-hot iron shoes at Snow White’s wedding. Ouch! Not for those of a faint constitution. Just how exactly does one balance the darkness with light in such a story?

Depending on your opinion, there’s plenty to love . . . or hate about this fairytale. For me, the idea of friends looking out for each other, the stranger who extends help with nothing to gain, and the determination to hold onto hope no matter how dark the situation, make the tale of Snow White worth keeping. Beauty and power are not the end goals. Friendship, loyalty, and courage are.

The Five Poisoned Apples authors of Rooglewood Press have worked to create five unique tellings that are quite simply  — not your grandmother’s Snow White. This is a young adult collection for ages 13 and up. There are a few chills and a dash of romance, but it’s suitable for most ages. Fans of Melanie Dickerson or Anne Elisabeth Stengl will find a series to enjoy!

And without further ado, I present Five Poisoned Apples!  A TALE SO DARK AND LOVELY.

Falling Snow: The strange dark circus is the only life she’s ever known—but is Snow a performer or a prisoner?  Skye Hoffert (You can check out her blog here).

Raven’s Heir: Taking her in could risk the lives of his rebel band—but how can Damien leave the young woman at the huntsman’s mercy?

The Fairest One: Her people look for the prophesied Fairest One—but can Livna find the courage to step out of the shadows and save her nation? Cortney Manning (You can check out her blog here).

Red as Blood: He’s been hired to assassinate the princess, no questions asked—but how can Zaig take the life of one so young, so innocent? Maddie Morrow (You can check out her blog here).

Snowbird and the Red Slippers: She longs to be worthy of the scholarship that changed her life—but can Jeong Hayan survive the bitter rivalry of a prestigious New York dance school? Rachael Wallen. (You can check out her blog here). And Tumblr here.

Experience the haunting beauty of Snow White in five thrilling retellings.

 

 

How about you? Do share about some of your favorite fairytales in the comments below. And don’t forget, Rooglewood Press is holding a Facebook Release party on December 1st from 7 to 10 pm, EST. Prizes and book giveaways galore. We would love to see you there!

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